19 Comments

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thenr0

I do, while most won't matter, some break stuff in later changes. Fixing it while writing doesn't cost much time, Currently helping out a team with less strict code conventions and my IDE shows so much yellow T_T. every commit is like "69420 warning commit anyway?". Even if you can't get rid of a warning, suppress it and comment why, so future devs know when they introduce new potential errors.

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nadeonao

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winnie_xi_flu

import warnings warnings.filterwarnings("ignore")

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marklondon75

Depends when you plan on leaving. "Feature is depricated and will not work in future upgrades" <evil laugh>

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terrassonmarc

You know, you had it exactly in reverse. Corporate doesn't care a flying f of warnings. A CEO of mine (software editor) once told "When your software doesn't have bugs, it's time to change it."

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nehio

I went from 64k warning to 14k in one week just by slowly doing things rights, warning are clutter that needs to be removed and fixed so your code is better

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zmalqop

Depends on the deadlines!

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kinda_retarded

Only shitty ones

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cewitz

I do. That’s why I hardly ever have my shit break down in production. Well it’s one reason, anyway.

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errorflynn

In the project I’m working on right now, PyLint on my Mac keeps complaining about failing to import some Windows-only library no matter what I do. I KNOW it won’t import, that’s why I put it in ’if sys.platform == ”windows”’ or whatever! Shut up, it works fine! Argh!

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